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Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda Pump Project – The Gambia

Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda Pump Project – The GambiaLocation
Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda (hamlet), Badibu, CRR-North, Gambia Touba Murit and Naani Kunda, Dankunku, CRR-South, Gambia Choya, Niamina West, CRR-South, Gambia

Community Description
These five communities are composed of poor subsistence coos and peanut farmers. As a transit point from North to South Bank of the Gambia River, Kaani Kunda also has a number of fishermen.

Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda are predominantly ethnic Mandinka. Touba is mostly Wolof. Naani Kunda and Choya are Fula villages. All of these smaller villages have received little in terms of NGO or government aid with the exception of Mark II handpumps, which were installed in the late 1990's. Sinchu Jaabo's was funded by Saudi Arabia through German NGO GTZ. Two of Kaani Kunda's pumps were installed as part of the Gambian-German Well Project. It is believed that Water Resources put in the rest at Touba, Naani Kunda, and Choya. All have seen little to no servicing. The pump at Choya has been neglected, and serious internal damage to the pump housing has occurred.

Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda Pump Project – The GambiaProject Description
This project seeks to rehabilitate 7 Mark II Handpumps in 3 districts in Central River Region, The Gambia. They are old and many have corroded and worn out parts.

The parts needing replacement:
Sinchu Jaabo: Handle bearings and axle (1 pump) Kaani Kunda: Handle bearings and axle, chains, new cylinder seals (2 pumps) Touba Murit: Handle bearings and axle, chains, new cylinder seals (1 pump) Naani Kunda: Handle bearings (2 pumps) Choya: Handle bearings and axle, chains, new cylinder seals, new handle and handle casing welds or replacement parts

A previous Water Charity grant has already supported the initial inspection of these pumps. Some additional parts needed to fix/maintain these pumps have already been purchased, including 2 cylinder repair kits, 1 handle axle, 7 handle bearing kits (bearings are the first thing to break in these Mark II pumps). Hamad Cham, a skilled welder and blacksmith from Sambang, Dankunku, has been dispatched to Choya to assess if the handles and handle casings of Choya's pumps can be fixed.

Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda Pump Project – The GambiaProject Impact
The beneficiaries of this project are estimated to number 3,130, broken down by community as follows:

Sinchu Jaabo 200
Kaani Kunda 1,000
Touba Murit 700
Naani Kunda 850
Choya 380

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jeremy Mak, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.

Comments
Water access is a huge problem, especially with outdated pumps for villages with only a single source of clean drinking water. This project accomplishes a tremendous amount in restoring pumps to effective use with limited resources.

Jeremy previously completed the Dankunku, Fula Kunda, and Brikama Lefaya Pump Project – The Gambia during his service as a Peace Corps Volunteer, and also finished the Niamina Dankunku Area Pump Project - The Gambia as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Jeremy and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Niamina Dankunku Area Pump Project - The Gambia

Niamina Dankunku Area Pump Project - The GambiaLocation
Dankunku District, Central River Region-South, The Gambia

Community Description
Dankunku, a predominantly ethnic Mandinka village, is the center of Niamina Dankunku District, and located 10 km off the Trans-Gambia South Bank Highway in the Central River Region, The Gambia. The population is comprised of roughly 2,000 residents coming from 140 or so compounds. Mostly subsistence farmers, in the rainy season residents grow coos, groundnuts, and rice.

However, because of poor dike management and torrential rains, much of 2010's year's rice harvest was lost. 2011's harvests were very poor because of extremely limited rain.

With most of the populace making less than $1 USD per day per capita, only a few compounds can afford to run generators for electricity, and only a handful have solar powered lights. A lower basic cycle school offers education up to grade 9 for children in the area that come from up to 10 kilometers away, and the village's health center serves 60 communities in the surround area with basic medical services. Five “bitiks” sell small consumer goods, like soap, cigarettes, and oil, and a few women make brisk business selling dried fish and seasonal vegetables. A much wider array of goods is available at weekly markets in nearby Jarreng and Bureng.

Niamina Dankunku Area Pump Project - The GambiaA solar borehole with 14 distribution taps was installed in 2007 as part of a rural water supply grant aid program from the Government of Japan. Each household contributes 30 dalasis (a little over $1) a month to pay for the upkeep of the system. However, many taps routinely leak or break altogether, and the pipes are corroding from the inside out.

Dependence on this solar borehole and distribution system over the years has allowed residents to overlook maintaining their handpumps and open wells. Out of village's 9 handpumps, only 4 work, (7 need repairs, and 2 have had various parts stolen). In the whole district, more than half of the handpumps need repair. Out of its open wells, only one still functions, primarily to water cattle from nearby Fula Kunda.

Should the solar borehole ever fail, there will be an acute water shortage. In addition, as a condition of receiving the borehole, residents are not officially permitted to use it for gardening or livestock purposes, although one group of women have informally started a dry season women's garden and many others have personal home gardens. If more water were available on a yearly basis, garden production would likely skyrocket, giving a much needed source of income to local women.

Dankunku's Health Center is also experiencing difficulties with water. Although it provides basic medical care and reproductive and child health services for the 2,000+ residents of its namesake, as well as more than 60 other villages in Niamina Dankunku and Niamina West Districts, it is not hooked up to the community's water system.

Niamina Dankunku Area Pump Project - The GambiaThe health center's facilities are in dire need of repair. Its solar water system broke over a year ago, one handpump has been stolen, and another one, although working, is in need of repair. "Water is our biggest problem," says community health nurse and midwife Ablie Jallow. “We need water in our clinic, especially our maternity ward. Without enough water, it's difficult to wash our hands to curb infection, much less disinfect our instruments."

Despite official assurances that the center's solar pump will be repaired, it has not yet been fixed. Currently, the health center uses water dispensed from the one remaining handpump. Servicing will allow the pump to deliver more water reliably.

Sara Sambel is a traditional coos and groundnut (peanut) growing and cattle-rearing Fula community that lies about 7 kilometers south of Dankunku, with about 10 compounds. Because of its small size, Sara Sambel has largely been left out of development projects. Unlike Dankunku, Sara Sambel does not have a solar borehole, but rather depends on a single Mark II handpump for its water needs. No maintenance has ever been done on the pump. Its well mechanism is rickety and only a limited amount of water comes out.

Project Description
This project is to rehabilitate two Mark II handpumps in the Niamina Dankunku Area, one at the Dankunku Health Center and the other at Sara Sambel.

The project will be undertaken under the direction of the Dankunku Health Center and the Sara Sambel Development Council.

Appropriate Projects funds will be used to purchase the well parts-repair kits for cylinder seals, handle bearings and axles, and new chains. Funds will be used to purchase Mark II handpump parts such as cylinder repair kits (1,650 dalasis each), pump chains (1,350 d/ea), handle axles(750 d/ea), handle bearings (350 d/ea), spacers, and housing bolt nuts. Modest transportation costs to cover travel to and from the spare part dealer in Banjul, the Gambian capital, as well as to Sara Sambel, are also covered.

All pumps will be serviced by Saja Jadama, a Dankunku native, who was trained for 7 months as an area well mechanic by the German NGO GITEC in 1992. He will supervise and implement repairs. He has all the necessary tools to disassemble and assemble well components.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak will oversee the purchase and transport of spare parts from Banjul, Gambia's capital, to site, as well as document receipts and all spending.

Recipient communities will pay Mr. Jadama's honorarium (15 dalasis per hour of work) and assist with transporting Mr. Jadama's tools to site.

Should any leftover funds allow for it, another handpump, either at the Dankunku school or at Sara Wallom, an 8 compound community will be fixed.

Project Impact
2,050 people will directly benefit, and 5,000 people will indirectly benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jeremy Mak, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer

Comments
This project exemplifies the dedication of Peace Corps Volunteers to their communities and their needs, even after their service has been concluded. It is the most basic and effective way to ensure the delivery of needed water to these underserved communities.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify the Peace Corps Volunteer of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Medina Serign Mass Health Center Composting Toilet Project – The Gambia

Medina Serign Mass Health Center Composting Toilet Project – The GambiaLocation
Medina Serign Mass, North Bank Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Medina Serign Mass is located in the North Bank region of The Gambia. It is a rural farming community of approximately 2,000 people. It is the home village of the Grand Imam of The Gambia, and is host to many large religious ceremonies every year.

The community is home to a basic cycle school (grades 1-8) and also the Medina Serign Mass Health Center.

The health center has its own well. However, the existing pit latrine in the compound has large cracks and is unsafe to use.

Medina Serign Mass Health Center Composting Toilet Project – The GambiaProject Description
This project is to build a public composting toilet inside the Health Center compound.

The design is for a two-chamber above-ground composting toilet. The enclosure built on top of the chambers will be of cement block, with a timber and tin roof.

The chambers below will be 60 cm deep and extend 3 m behind the enclosures. Each chamber will each have an access cover at the back, and a cover to accept waste.

Each chamber will be lined with millet stalks and/or grasses (depending on the season) and will be fitted with a drain pipe to drain excess moisture. Vent pipes will draw air for oxygenation of the compost.

Medina Serign Mass Health Center Composting Toilet Project – The GambiaAshes, collected from neighboring compounds and stored in each enclosure, will be added to the compost pile each time waste is added. When the pile begins to compost, it will be raked toward the back of the chamber to make room for new additions.

The compost produced will be used for the garden on the health center grounds.

Project funds will be used to purchase construction materials, including cement, corrugated tin, timbers, sand, gravel, and rebar.

The Medina Serign Mass Health Center Committee will be in charge of construction and the resident caretaker will be in charge of maintenance.

A senior member of the committee (who is also the village development committee chair) has experience with construction of many types of toilets, including the planned composting toilet.

Project Impact
All 2,000 residents of Medina Serign Mass will benefit from the set of composting latrines.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
James Blaine Byers

Comments
This is a high-impact low-cost solution for a critical need, toilet facilities for a health center visited by every member of the community. The composting design is not only environmentally sound, but produces the usable byproduct of fertilizer for the garden.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation together friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer James Blaine Byers.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify James of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by him and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Ker Njugarey Pump Repair Project – The Gambia

Ker Njugarey Pump Repair Project – The GambiaLocation
Ker Njugarey, Jokadou District, North Bank Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Ker Njugarey is a small community of 45 compounds combining to reach a population of around 850 people. It is located in the Jokadou District of the North Bank Region of The Gambia. The village is a multi-ethnic community consisting of mainly Fulas, but also containing a few Wolof compounds.

The primary source of income is the farming of coos, ground nuts and maize. However, there are also some entrepreneurs and skilled laborers, such as bitik owners, vendors, carpenters, masons and tailors.

Ker Njugarey Pump Repair Project – The GambiaSituated 8-10 kilometers north of the main highway system on the Senegalese border, and only reachable by a pothole-marked and dusty road, this highly rural village is incredibly reliant on the existing wells and pumps (in poor working order) that currently supply the people with their water.

The village is filled with many hardworking and industrious people, but they are currently being failed by their government in that they have not been provided with a constant and reliable source of sanitary water.

Project Description
This project is to restore an existing hand pump well to reliable and working order.

Ker Njugarey Pump Repair Project – The GambiaAfter years of patch jobs and quick fixes the hand pump is in very bad working order, constantly needing maintenance and attention. With the money properly allocated, the village will be able to overhaul and replace many of the crucial parts that, as of today, are well past their date of validity, and thus falling apart from years of work.

The project is being implemented under the direction of the Ker Njugarey Village Development Committee. A pump parts supplier is holding the parts needed for the project, and the repair man and day laborers are standing by ready to start.

Project Impact
850 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Wells Brown

Comments
This project will assist the village to obtain a constant source of clean and sanitary drinking water.

Wells previously successfully completed the Medina Njama Pump Repair Project – The Gambia and the Ker Njugarey Pump Repair Project – The Gambia.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative, with additional funds from the Elmo Foundation for future projects.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify the Peace Corps Volunteer of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Jamally Ganyado Pump Repair Project – The Gambia

Jamally Ganyado Pump Repair Project – The GambiaLocation
Jamally Ganyado, Central River Region, Sami District, The Gambia

Community Description
The community of Jamally Ganyado is a rural community located on the north bank in the Central River Region of the Gambia about 5 kilometers from Janjanbury. The village is mostly made up of people from the Fula tribe.

Thirty four families, about 1,000 people, live here and survive by growing most of their own food. Families grow coos, groundnuts, and corn. The community has a large women's group that makes handcrafts, soaps, and gardens.

Jamally Ganyado Pump Repair Project – The GambiaThe community has no electricity and gets its water from three hand pumps distributed around the village. These pumps were installed in 1993 and frequently break down. When a pump breaks, the line at the other pumps grows longer. On average, only one pump is working at any one time in the village, making the wait for water anywhere from an hour to three hours. This drastically cuts into time the women have for other chores and their families.

The community does its best to repair the pumps when they break. Every family contributes money to replace broken parts to fix the pumps. However since the pumps are so old, replacing one part at a time does not fix the pump for long. The interaction of the old parts with a new quickly causes the new part to break down and fail.

In the last few months the community has repaired one hand pump or another seven times. There have been a few days where all pumps were broken and the community was left without water.

Jamally Ganyado Pump Repair Project – The GambiaProject Description
This project is to completely repair one of hand pumps in the village.

The one that is currently in the worst state of repair has been chosen for a complete repair with all new parts. Once repaired, the pump will function like new and should not need to be repaired for at least three years.

The project with be overseen by Dowda Inji a member of the Village Development Committee. The repair will be completed by the pump repair man from a village next to Jamally Ganyado. He will be assisted by men from the community.

Funds that may remain after the repair will be used to purchase parts needed for the repair of the other two pumps.

The village has shown its commitment to providing clean water for its families by continually contributing money to repair their pumps. Families will continue to contribute to a fund for future pump repairs.

Project Impact
1,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Stephanie Starch

Comments
Because of economic factors, the community is faced with times when water is only sporadically available. While this project is not enough to ensure sustainability, it at least creates a time period when water will be regularly available, while at the same creates a breather for the community to build its reserves for future repairs.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Stephanie Starch.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Stephanie of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Stephanie and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Kerr Werko Well Repair Project – The Gambia

Kerr Werko Well Repair Project – The GambiaLocation
Kerr Werko (Sotokoi), Upper Niumi District, North Bank Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Kerr Werko (Sotokoi) is a rural village located in the northern part of The Gambia, in the Upper Niumi District. Culturally, it is composed of many tribes, the Wolof, the Fulla, Mandinka, and Seerer. It is the home of about 350 people, whose livelihood depends on farming and livestock. Though the village is small, it is diverse and peaceful.

Obtaining enough water for survival is very difficult due to the location of Kerr Werko. The water table in the area is at a depth of 25 meters. The inhabitants of Kerr Werko rely on one hand pump for drinking water, and another which is used only for laundry and cleaning (the water from that one has a salty taste that deters the villagers from drinking it).

About two years ago, the people of Kerr Werko realized that the water from the pump for drinking had acquired an odd taste and smell. However, no one became sick, so they continued to drink it, not knowing the cause. Last month, the pump stopped producing water, leaving the community members to walk to the next village to fetch water from an uncovered well.

Upon inspection of the faulty well, they discovered that a tap root from a nearby tree had broken through several sections of the well's retaining wall. In time, the root had reached the bottom of the well, and sucked it dry.

Kerr Werko Well Repair Project – The GambiaProject Description
This project is to repair the well and restore it to full functionality to provide safe drinking water. The project will be carried out under the direction of the Kerr Werko (Sotokoi) Water Committee.

Project funds will be used to purchase 11 bags of cement, 9 rods of two sizes, binding wire, transport of these materials, and to pay for the services of a trained mason to make the appropriate repairs and extend the well.

In the past, the villagers have pooled their money to make minor repairs on the pump. However, after consulting the mechanic, they realized that the required maintenance is beyond their means.

Project Impact
The project will benefit about 350 people, including 225 children. In addition, guests and civil workers who visit the community will also benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Mallory Pohlman

Comments
With the whole community of Kerr Werko relying so heavily on this one well, it is very important that the water supply be healthy and abundant. This simple project restores potable water to the village.

Mallory previously successfully completed the Kerr Ardo Well Repair Project – The Gambia.

Dollar Amount of Project
$525.00

Donations Collected to Date
$525.00

Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Mallory Pohlman of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Mallory and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Dankunku, Fula Kunda, and Brikama Lefaya Pump Project – The Gambia

Dankunku, Fula Kunda, and Brikama Lefaya Pump Project – The Gambia Location
Dankunku, Fula Kunda, and Brikama Lefaya - all located in Niamina Dankunku District, Central River Region-South, The Gambia

Community Description
Dankunku, a predominantly ethnic Mandinka village, is the center of Niamina Dankunku District, and located 10 km off the Trans-Gambia South Bank Highway in the Central River Region, The Gambia. The population is comprised of roughly 2,000 residents coming from 140 or so compounds. Mostly subsistence farmers, in the rainy season residents grow coos, groundnuts, and rice. However, because of poor dike management and torrential rains, much of last year's rice harvest was lost.

With most of the populace making less than $1 USD per day per capita, only a few compounds can afford to run generators for electricity, and only a handful have solar powered lights. A lower basic cycle school offers education up to grade 9 for children in the area that come from up to 10 kilometers away, and the village's health center serves 60 communities in the surround area with basic medical services. Five “bitiks” sell small consumer goods, like soap, cigarettes, and oil, and a few women make brisk business selling dried fish and seasonal vegetables. A much wider array of goods is available at weekly markets in nearby Jarreng and Bureng.

Dankunku, Fula Kunda, and Brikama Lefaya Pump Project – The Gambia A solar borehole with 14 distribution taps was installed in 2007 as part of a rural water supply grant aid program from the Government of Japan. Each household contributes 30 dalasis (a little over $1) a month to pay for the upkeep of the system. However, many taps routinely leak or break altogether, and the pipes are corroding from the inside out.

Dependence on this solar borehole and distribution system over the years has allowed residents to overlook maintaining their handpumps and open wells. Out of Dankunku's 9 handpumps, only 4 work, (7 need repairs, and 2 have had various parts stolen). Out of its open wells, only one still functions, primarily to water cattle from nearby Fula Kunda.

Should the solar borehole ever fail, there will be an acute water shortage. In addition, as a condition of receiving the borehole, residents are not officially permitted to use it for gardening or livestock purposes, although one group of women have informally started a dry season women's garden and many others have personal home gardens. If more water were available on a yearly basis, garden production would likely skyrocket, giving a much needed source of income to local women.

Dankunku, Fula Kunda, and Brikama Lefaya Pump Project – The Gambia Dankunku's Health Center is also experiencing difficulties with water. Although it provides basic medical care and reproductive and child health services for the 2,000+ residents of its namesake, as well as more than 60 other villages in Niamina Dankunku and Niamina West Districts, it is not hooked up to the community's water system.

The health center's facilities are in dire need of repair. Its solar water system broke over a year ago, one handpump has been stolen, and another one, although working, is in need of repair. "Water is our biggest problem," says community health nurse and midwife Ablie Jallow. “We need water in our clinic, especially our maternity ward. Without enough water, it's difficult to wash our hands to curb infection, much less disinfect our instruments." Currently, the health center uses water dispensed from the one remaining handpump. Servicing will allow the pump to deliver more water reliably.

Fula Kunda and Brikama Lefaya are traditional coos and groundnut (peanut) growing and cattle-rearing Fula communities that lie just outside of Dankunku proper. Because of their relatively small-size in relation to Dankunku (Fula Kunda has 460 people from 16 compounds, Lefaya has 39 from 3 compounds), Fula Kunda and Lefaya have largely been left out of development projects from which Dankunku has benefited in the past, such as savings and loan fund, a grain processing machine, a dairy, and a school wood lot. Fula Kunda has recently received a coos milling machine and fencing for a vegetable garden from the Community Driven Development Project (CDDP) Funds and The World Bank, but little else.

Dankunku, Fula Kunda, and Brikama Lefaya Pump Project – The Gambia Both Fula Kunda and Lefaya are more proactive than Dankunku about development, with Lefaya taking the lead on developing a mango orchard, intercropping coos with cashews, demarcating a gmelina woodlot, and raising African mahogany seedlings for lumber down the line, improving soil fertility, and growing a live fence for gardening, in addition to experimenting with beekeeping. Fula Kunda is on its heels to play catch-up and there is talk about setting up a cashew and gmelina lot soon.

However, unlike Dankunku, Fula Kunda and Lefaya regrettably do not have solar boreholes, but rather depend on Mark II handpumps for their water needs. Fula Kunda's 2 handpumps were installed by Gambia's water resources department in 1994. Lefaya's single pump was installed in 1999. Without proper servicing and replacement of movable parts, one of Fula Kunda's pumps has broken, and the remaining one is dangerously loose on its mounting block (missing and old nuts and bolts). Lefaya's pump was haphazardly repaired a few years back, but needs new parts for continued service.

The state of the pumps in Fula Kunda has caused much concern. As there is only one working pump there now, which gives a small amount of water, the pump is in constant use. Many women and girls have been going to nearby Dankunku, about a quarter of a kilometer, to fetch water since last year. However, Dankunku residents have demanded that Fula Kunda pay them to use their water system, and depending on its neighbor's water source for future sustenance will only lead to greater conflicts over resource sharing for Fula Kunda.

Also, the preoccupation of Fula Kunda and Lefaya men with water for their livestock (hundreds of heads of cattle at Fula Kunda) is at odds with women and girl's responsibilities of collecting water for domestic chores, cooking, and washing. The men get priority over the women, and for the Fula Kunda women, this can mean pumping late into the night after the cows have been watered.

Project Description
This project is to rehabilitate 4 Mark II handpumps in the Niamina Dankunku area: 1 at the Dankunku Health Center, 2 at Fula Kunda, and 1 at Brikama Lefaya.

The project will be undertaken under the direction of the Dankunku Health Center, Lefaya Village Development Council, and Fula Kunda Village Development Council.

All these Mark II handpumps were installed over 10 years ago and are in need of replacement parts. For all of them, handle bearings have broken and bolts are rusting and falling off. The Dankunku Health Center and Fula Kunda Mark II's have German cylinders that need their rubber liner suction cups replaced (sold in repair kits) and new chains installed. Fula Kunda's pumps need new handle axles as well.

Appropriate Projects funds will be used to purchase the well parts, as well as miscellaneous parts, such as bolts and handle bearings, for quick fixes of other Mark II pumps in the area. If a repair kit is found for Lefaya's Dutch Mark II pump cylinder, it will be purchased in lieu of the quick fix option. The state of Lefaya’s pump is not nearly as woeful as Fula Kunda’s.

All pumps have already been inspected by Saja Jadama, a Dankunku native, who was trained for 7 months as an area well mechanic by the German NGO GITEC in 1992. He will supervise and implement repairs. He has all the necessary tools to disassemble and assemble well components. Dankunku-based Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak will oversee the purchase and transport of spare parts from Banjul, Gambia's capital, to site, as well as document receipts and all spending.

Recipient communities will pay Mr. Jadama's honorarium (15 dalasis per hour of work) and assist with transporting Mr. Jadama's tools to site.

In addition, recipient communities will be involved in a series of meetings facilitated by the PCV to develop community-based strategies that aim to 1) educate locals on proper maintenance and care of pumps to prolong pump service life, 2) develop village water committees and village contribution-based funds so that communities can independently pay for future well repairs, 3) find apprentices to carry on Mr. Jadama's repair work in the future (he is ageing), and 4) brainstorm ideas to address expanding water infrastructure needs (i.e. gardening, water storage, borehole).

Already Fula Kunda is organizing community contributions to repair a water collection trough for cattle that will receive water from the 2 pumps.

Project Impact
2,500 people (2,000+ in Dankunku, 460 in Fula Kunda, and 36 in Lefaya) will directly benefit, and more than 60 villages will indirectly benefit (from the rehabilitated pump at Dankunku health center) from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jeremy Mak

Comments
This is a critical project for the villages, utilizing the most basic repairs to restore access to water. It is remarkably well-organized, and incorporates sustainability into its design.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Jeremy and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Ker Jain Pump Repair Project – The Gambia

Ker Jain Pump Repair Project – The GambiaLocation
Ker Jain, Jokadou District, North Bank Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Ker Jain is a small community of 77 family compounds totaling around 1,250 people, in the Jokadou district of the North Bank Region, The Gambia. The village is a multi-ethnic community consisting of Sereers, Fulas, and Wolofs.

Situated 10 kilometers north of the main highway system, and on the edge of the Senegalese border, this highly rural village is incredibly reliant on the wells and pumps that currently supply the peoples with water.

The primary source of income for the community is the farming of groundnuts, coos, maize and a small amount of animal rearing and breeding. However, there are also businessmen and women working within the village as bitik owners, tailors, bakers, restaurateurs, gardeners and vendors within the weekly market. All of these people, including the hundreds of traders and customers who descend upon the weekly market, and their livestock, rely on 3 existing hand-pump wells that are in dire need of repair, and one thoroughly un-hygienic open well.

Ker Jain Pump Repair Project – The GambiaAs it stands now only one of the hand-pumps is in consistent working order while the other two are constantly being repaired to the best of the financial ability of the community. As a result of the lack of properly working hand pumps the women are quite often forced to spend full days in the sun waiting for their chance to use the pump, to pull water from the open well, or go to the neighboring village of Ker Njugarey. The first option demands a great amount of time and manual labor to hand pull the water from the 35-meter deep water table. The second option produces water that may be unsafe. The third option requires water to be hauled over great distances, and puts a strain on the pumps of the neighboring village.

Project Description
This project is to repair one of the hand-pump wells in Ker Jain, and to repair additional pumps as funds allow.

The project is being implemented under the direction of Mr. Alieu Ndure, as head of the Ker Jain Village Development Committee.

Ker Jain Pump Repair Project – The GambiaThe first well to be serviced is located on the western edge of town surrounded by 7 family compounds with about 65-70 people living within them. The catchments area for this particular pump is about 15 compounds totaling around 150-175 people.

The work on this pump will just be a general overhaul of the parts, essentially revamping the whole system. The parts to be replaced include the chain, end cap, end tube, bearings, pump arm, pump cylinder, hardware, and rod guides. This constitutes almost all pieces other than the main sleeve.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the bulk of the parts.

The pump arm will be replaced by the village. This is an expensive piece (around 4,000 Dalasi brand new) and it is a big sign of commitment. They had to work very hard to scrape these funds together.

In addition, the village will provide necessary labor. The VDC chairman, who is related to the pump man who did the work on the Medina Njama pump, has asked the repairman to do the work free of charge.

There are steps being taken to accumulate money for the next repair. The village has a milling machine, which they charge people to use. The proceeds will be divided in half so that there are two accounts, one for the maintenance and upkeep of the milling machine and the second for the future maintenance and upkeep for the pump.

Project Impact
About 175 people within the catchment area will directly benefit from the project. In addition, 1,250 people, constituting the weekly influx for the market, will also benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Wells Brown

Comments
The repair and maintenance of the current hand-pumps will greatly improve the village’s access to clean water. The village understands the need for sustainability, and has undertaken measures to ensure that there will be resources to maintain the pumps in the village in the future.

Wells previously successfully completed the Medina Njama Pump Repair Project – The Gambia.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Wells Brown of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Wells and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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