We do small but critical water and sanitation projects worldwide using appropriate technology. We invite your participation.


Introduction 2014 sticky icon

We are water.WHAT WE DO

As an initiative of Water Charity, we do small but critical water and sanitation projects. Each one is a solution to a problem, costs no more than $600, and uses appropriate technology. We start them at once and complete them very quickly.

We work with Peace Corps Volunteers serving throughout the world, who assist people and organizations in or near the communities where they live or work to identify, implement, manage, and evaluate the projects.

Each project has a high impact, resulting in clean water and effective sanitation for individuals, families, and communities. We are flexible, and can react to emergencies.

We offer you, individuals and organizations alike, the opportunity to participate in our work, and fund these projects, in whole or in part.

At this time, we are not accepting unsolicited proposals.

Conclusion of Sare Bidji Moringa Group Well Project – Senegal

Conclusion of Sare Bidji Moringa Group Well Project – SenegalThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Adrian Martinez. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to build a well in to provide water for the moringa garden.

Adrian reports:

We completed the well and water system for the Sare Bidji Moringa Group.

We began the well last year with a well digger who turned out to talk a lot and not work. We would spend weeks without seeing him and then he would show up and work for another day and ask for money. It was mismanagement on my part and also a poor read of character. We proceeded to find other diggers and masons to replace the original and finish the work.

We hit the static water depth last December, but work was delayed until we reached the final depth in April. The workers completed the project, providing water within the one hectare fenced-in area, with plans for expansion.

I added funding with another grant for the project which allowed us to install a solar water pump and plumbing with four faucets around the garden. We also built a hut in the garden to process the moringa leaves and have a guard for the equipment.

We added more trees to the garden during the last dry season since we had the water. There are now more than 500 trees in the garden, some of which have grown to be 2 feet tall. We are testing spacing with the PKM1 variety we had imported from India. More than 200 trees are spaced at 3 meters in and between rows. The rest are spaced at 3 meters in the rows and 5 meters between the rows to allow for alley cropping. The entire space of the garden will hold more than 1,000 trees when completed, aided by the new well and water system.

I recently left Peace Corps and Senegal and was pleased that the project was successful. On behalf of myself, the group members, and the community, I would like so tell you “Thank you very much.”

We, in turn are grateful to Adrian for completing the project, and again extend our thanks to Douglas Wolf, who funded the project in honor of Larry Barham.

Conclusion of Sare Bidji Moringa Group Well Project – SenegalConclusion of Sare Bidji Moringa Group Well Project – Senegal

Conclusion of Mboro Master Farm Project – Senegal

Conclusion of Mboro Master Farm Project – SenegalThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Tim Johnson.

Conclusion of Little Sunshine Kindergarten Bathroom Project – Ukraine

Conclusion of Little Sunshine Kindergarten Bathroom Project – UkraineThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Blakely Neff. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to build a bathroom with two working toilets, two sinks, and a wash basin with a shower hose, within the kindergarten.

Blakely reports:

The project has been completed.

All Peace Corps Volunteers were evacuated from Ukraine in February, 2013 due to the geopolitical situation. At the time, the project was still in progress. However, the school was able to proceed to finish the project.

The kindergarten in the town of Boguslavka, Borova District, Ukraine did not have indoor toilets. Since adult outhouses were located 35 meters from the kindergarten, and especially difficult to reach during winter months, the children utilized buckets, which the employees had to handle and dispose of the waste.

Two children-sized sit-down toilets, two sinks, a shower, and appropriate plumbing/piping were installed inside the kindergarten by experienced plumbers, with the assistance of school personnel. Waste is now properly disposed of, and the children have greater privacy and convenience.

This project greatly increases sanitary conditions for around 50 children and 11 staff members of the Boguslavka kindergarten. The project has been such a positive development for people in this part of Eastern Ukraine, who are currently experiencing social and political unrest.

We extend our gratitude to Blakely for seeing this important project through to completion despite the adversity.

Conclusion of Little Sunshine Kindergarten Bathroom Project – UkraineConclusion of Little Sunshine Kindergarten Bathroom Project – Ukraine

Conclusion of Fass Kahone Pump Repair Project - Senegal

Conclusion of Fass Kahone Pump Repair Project - SenegalThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Elizabeth Keller. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was initially designed to repair the hand pump in Fass Kahone, but because of difficulties encountered, it changed to a broader objective of improving 8 wells in the community.

Elizabeth reports:

I worked closely with my host father, Alfa Balde, the primary health worker at Fass Kahone’s case de santé, and my Peace Corps community counterpart, Omar Balde. After several attempts to obtain solid quotes for repair of the pump, it was determined that it would not be feasible within the existing funding.

Omar suggested using the project funds instead to renovate 6 wells in the village, in addition to building 2 well heads for new wells that lacked bases. The funds would be used exclusively for materials, and all of the labor would be done by the beneficiaries. Alfa and I agreed, and obtained the approval of the community.

Omar and I examined all 8 wells in the village. The concrete on the 6 wells that had well heads would often fall inside the wells, contaminating the drinking water. The 2 wells that did not have well heads were dangerous, and had to be covered by piles of brush so no one would fall in.

Where pulleys were lacking, people would throw buckets with ropes attached inside the wells and pull water up themselves. Buckets would often scrape against the sides of the well, and dirt would fall into the water.

We purchased 34 bags of cement to renovate the wells and build the new well heads. We also bought 8 new high-quality pulleys to replace broken pulleys and install pulleys where none existed previously. The small amount of money that remained was used to buy a new tarp for the roof of Fass Kahone’s case de santé.

The work was completed on 4 of the wells. The materials are available for the remainder, and the final 4 families have plans to complete their renovations in the near future.

While the outcome of this project was different than what was anticipated, it has still proven beneficial to the community. It is my hope that this project, along with continuing education on water sanitation and hygiene, will reduce diarrheal disease throughout Fass Kahone.

We are grateful to Elizabeth for concluding this project, despite the difficulties. We again extend our thanks to Marcia Wijngaarden for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Fass Kahone Pump Repair Project - SenegalConclusion of Fass Kahone Pump Repair Project - Senegal

College and Ecole Elementaire Bathroom Water Project - Senegal

College and Ecole Elementaire Bathroom Water Project - SenegalLocation
Khogue, Louga Region, Senegal

Community Description
Khogue is a village of 770 people situated in the Djolof region of Senegal. Dry, sandy and arid, one of the main concerns of the community is access to water, both for health and agriculture.

The school educates children from the ages of 7 to 17, and has a staff of about 14 teachers

Problem Addressed
The school has 8 bathroom stalls for the use of the students, and none designated for faculty. While the facilities are structurally sound, there has never been access to running water. This means that it is impossible to use the bathroom, clean it, or to wash hands.

There is a high rate of diarrheal illness caused by lack of hygiene. Despite efforts by local health workers to teach proper handwashing practices, the lack of running water is a barrier to the actual implementation of these practices.

College and Ecole Elementaire Bathroom Water Project - Senegal

Project Description
This project is to provide running water for the school bathrooms, and to construct a new faculty bathroom.

A supply line will be connected to the main water line to serve the bathrooms, and piping will be run to, and a faucet installed in, each of the 9 toilet stalls.

New doors will be installed on the existing stalls, and a staff restroom will be created to ensure teacher/student privacy.

Each classroom will receive a toilet kettle to keep in their room, as well as a supply of soap.

In conjunction with continued handwashing seminars, a mural will be painted on the toilet to encourage proper hygiene. The school staff will organize and monitor student groups to keep the toilets clean, and the school fund will ensure a steady supply of cleaning materials.

Project Impact
Approximately 270 students and a staff of 14 will benefit from the project

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Rebecca Verlaque

Comments
This is an important infrastructure project for the school that will improve the health and wellbeing of students and staff.

Dollar Amount of Project
$472.50

Donations Collected to Date
$0.00

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

Dollar Amount Needed
$472.50

Conclusion of Novomykolaivka, School Number Two Water Project – Ukraine

Conclusion of Novomykolaivka, School Number Two Water Project – Ukraine This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Robert Snow. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to build a water storage system and install water heaters at the school.

Robert reports:

I am pleased to announce that the project was finished at my school!

The first step of the project involved the director of the school, the school physics teacher/maintenance man and I shopping in the city for our materials. We found the pump and water reservoir relatively quickly; however, deciding on which boilers to buy took some time to talk through. After much deliberation, everyone agreed it would be better, both economically and strategically, if one large boiler was bought for both washing hands and the shower rooms. Having one boiler made it easier to hook up the piping to the reservoir.

My neighbor was kind enough to bring his power tools to the school and drill all necessary holes through the walls that were required for the project. The reservoir and pump were installed in a room next to the kitchen, hand washing station, and shower rooms. The boiler was installed to this reservoir and piping then split in two directions, one toward the kitchen, the other to the sinks and showers. The water is easily accessible to the nurse as well, as her office is just one door away.

All in all, everyone at school was excited and relieved. The project could not have been completed at a more opportune time, for temperatures dropped into the twenties and during the installation, school had to be cut short due to lack of water.

I know my director and everyone in the community appreciates the project and I want to thank you for everything.

We extend our thanks to Robert for completing this project prior to the evacuation of the Peace Corps Volunteers from Ukraine.

Conclusion of Novomykolaivka, School Number Two Water Project – UkraineConclusion of Novomykolaivka, School Number Two Water Project – Ukraine

Conclusion of Kimathi Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project – Kenya

Conclusion of Kimathi Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project – KenyaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Jennifer Navala. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to build a rainwater catchment system at the school.

Jennifer reports:

The Kimathi School installed a 5,000 liter water tank and gutter system to capture rainwater in the wet environment of the Aberdare Mountains.

The project proceeded according to plan. A tank was purchased in the nearby town of Engineer and transported to the school. The base was constructed by parents and teachers using dirt and cement. The gutters and piping were installed by the parents and teachers.

The Kimathi staff and parents were extremely grateful for this addition to their new primary school, consisting of only one small building for classes 1, 2, and 3. Because of the rural location of the school, and the limited funds, only these three classes can be held.

The addition of a water tank to the meager beginnings of a school was much appreciated, as was shown by the donations of the parents and teachers to purchase and install a cement base and piping for the water tank.

On the day that the water tank was brought, parents were invited to a session that the Community Health Workers (volunteers) and PCV Jennifer Navala had planned. The group taught nutrition and dental hygiene.

In addition to the session, parents and students planted five trees brought by the volunteers.

The water tank not only brings a source of water to the young children at the school, but it provides a chance to educate adults on the importance of good hygiene and health.

We are grateful to Jennifer for completing this project, her fourth in partnership with Water Charity.

Conclusion of Kimathi Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project – KenyaConclusion of Kimathi Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project – Kenya

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United We Serve

Peace CorpsThis summer the Peace Corps community has an opportunity to be part of an extraordinary effort to improve our communities through volunteer service. President Obama’s summer service initiative, United We Serve, is a call to all Americans to join a volunteer effort this summer and be part of building a new foundation for America, one community at a time. Please visit the United We Serve website to learn about how you can be a part.