We do small but critical water and sanitation projects worldwide using appropriate technology. We invite your participation.


Introduction 2014 sticky icon

We are water.WHAT WE DO

As an initiative of Water Charity, we do small but critical water and sanitation projects. Each one is a solution to a problem, costs no more than $600, and uses appropriate technology. We start them at once and complete them very quickly.

We work with Peace Corps Volunteers serving throughout the world, who assist people and organizations in or near the communities where they live or work to identify, implement, manage, and evaluate the projects.

Each project has a high impact, resulting in clean water and effective sanitation for individuals, families, and communities. We are flexible, and can react to emergencies.

We offer you, individuals and organizations alike, the opportunity to participate in our work, and fund these projects, in whole or in part.

At this time, we are not accepting unsolicited proposals.

Conclusion of Toichu Aktanov Primary School and Secondary School Handwashing Station Project – Kyrgyzstan

Conclusion of Toichu Aktanov Primary School and Secondary School Handwashing Station Project – KyrgyzstanThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Alexandra Biron. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to provide water and handwashing facilities at the Kashka Suu village schools.

Alexandra reports:

Our project provided running water to the secondary school in Toichu Aktanov.

A trench was dug to lay pipe from the water source to the school, with the work done by students and teachers. The community provided a jack hammer to dig through pavement on a road.

The school installed pipes, fixtures, and fittings to make two handwashing stations within the school and one spigot outside the school for washing the floors.

The project has also made clean running water accessible to households near the school.

We extend our thanks to Alexandra for completing this project.

Conclusion of Rwamagana School Water Project – Rwanda

Conclusion of Rwamagana School Water Project – RwandaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Malcolm Cunningham. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to install a rainwater collection and storage system for Excel Bilingual Nursery and Primary School.

Malcolm reports:

I worked with a local contractor on identifying the materials and tank suitable for the rainwater catchment system. The base was constructed with large stones, cement and sand, all purchased locally. Local laborers helped the contractor to build the base.

The 2,500 liter tank was purchased and transported from Kigali. The cost of transport was higher than expected, but after discussing the issue with the tank company, we were able to reduce the price so that we remained within the budget allotted.

The headmaster of Excel School, Callixte Kalimwabo was pleased with the project, and understood the responsibility of the school to complete the final phase of installation of the gutters and piping to carry water to tank.

We are grateful to Malcolm for carrying this project forward prior to his departure from Rwanda. We again wish to thank the Elmo Foundation for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Rwamagana School Water Project – RwandaConclusion of Rwamagana School Water Project – Rwanda

Conclusion of Nyamanga Handwashing Station Project – Kenya

Conclusion of Nyamanga Handwashing Station Project – KenyaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Elise Wojcik. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to provide handwashing stations at the local health clinic and 4 nearby schools.

Elise reports:

Through the help of Water Charity, the community of Karungu was able construct 9 handwashing stations and deliver them to seven schools and one health clinic.

Each station consists of a metal stand and a 50 L jerrycan with a metal tap.

The chairman of the Nyamanga clinic helped to negotiate the costs and transportation to the sites. A local welder constructed and painted nine metal bases, purchased nine 50 L jerrycans, and fixed the taps to the bases of the jerrycans.

Six schools each received one station, one large school received two, and the last one went to the Nyamanga Dispensary.

Staff at the schools and the clinic were incredibly thankful, and expressed relief at having a better means for students and themselves to wash their hands.

The nurses at the Nyamanga clinic told us again how much of a problem diarrheal diseases are for the children in the community. Having a handwashing station at the school reduces the spread of disease in the school, and reinforces handwashing as a good health habit for the students.

"We have great appreciation for this donation" said one teacher during a handing-over ceremony. "This is something we have needed for a long time."

This project will improve the hygiene levels for the several thousand students who attend these schools, as well as over five thousand patients who visit the health clinic each year.

We are grateful to Elise for completing this important project.

Conclusion of Nyetane Neighborhood Care Point Latrine Project – Swaziland

Conclusion of Nyetane Neighborhood Care Point Latrine Project – SwazilandThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Shari Orr. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to construct pit latrines at the center. Shari reports:

The Nyetane NCP committee received the funds for the pit latrine project on 18 February, 2014. The project leaders immediately went shopping to purchase all necessary supplies, saving receipts for each purchase and purchasing only supplies needed to build the toilets.

Construction of the toilets began on 24 February. Although the project was delayed due to two solid weeks of rain, which prevented laying any cement, the group was able to finish the project the first week of April. Allowing two weeks unavoidable delay due to inclement weather, the group completed the project within the allotted four weeks (18 February to 1 April).

As planned, Maggie Gwebu and Victoria Ndzinisa served as project managers. These two women did a phenomenal job of communicating between the Peace Corps Volunteer, the NCP adult leaders, and Mfanasibili Tsabedze, who completed all construction. Mr. Ndzabanzaba served to transport the materials (David Tfwala, the original transport manager, was unavailable for the proposed shopping date) and even made a second volunteer trip to town to get the last of the supplies.

Conclusion of Nyetane Neighborhood Care Point Latrine Project – SwazilandAs planned, the community donated the land for the toilets, even allowing the original fencing to be moved to include an entryway into the toilet from inside the NCP yard. Community members also donated their time to assist in moving cement blocks, sealing the bricks, and painting. Mfanasibili Tsabedze was compensated 100 emalangeni (about $9 USD) for his time, which is far less than his usual rate.

The Appropriate Projects funds were used to purchase the equipment needed for the pit latrines, transport to go to and from Siteki (a nearby town) to estimate costs, bank fees for the initial money transfer, and a minimal amount of air time to facilitate phone calls between project planners.

The completed pit latrine is one building with two stalls, each containing one toilet. The pit was dug prior to the project start, using community tools, and the community had already laid a foundation of bricks and wood for a floor. The floor platform is made of cement, including two holes for the toilets, which the toilet seats fit over. The pit latrine building is approximately 2.5 meters long, 1.25 meters long, and 2.5 meters high.

The pit latrine walls are made of cement bricks, produced by community members. The walls are completely solid except for a small, high window in the back wall of the pit latrine, to allow light and ventilation. The outer walls include metal hooks, which are securely fastened to the wire fencing that now incorporates the pit latrine into the NCP yard.

Conclusion of Nyetane Neighborhood Care Point Latrine Project – SwazilandThe roof is made of sheet metal securely nailed over wooden rafters. The doors are fitted snugly into the doorframes and swing open easily. Each door also has a lock and key, which will stay with the NCP adult leaders to ensure the toilets are kept in good condition when the NCP is not occupied.

Moving forward, the Nyetane community will be responsible for maintenance and care of the completed toilet. Mrs. Ndzinisa and Mrs. Gwebu, as leaders of the Neighborhood Care Point, have headed the project committee and will continue to provide leadership as maintenance is needed. They will be responsible for maintaining the toilet on a daily basis and for mobilizing community members to volunteer for occasional maintenance.

The first school term of 2014 is now ending, which means that children will not be regularly coming to the NCP for several weeks. The community plans to do a handwashing and sanitation awareness day with the NCP children and adult leaders once the second school term has begun.

The completed project has left some cement, bricks, and sheet metal unused and unreturnable. The NCP adult leaders have proposed to use these extra materials, as well as timber, doors, toilet seats, and additional cement donated from the community, to build a second toilet within one year. This toilet would be situated outside the NCP yard and would be left unlocked, allowing general members of the community to use it freely. This idea was proposed by the NCP adult leaders and approved by the PCV after the initial project was completed, particularly because of the sanitation benefits it will provide to the neighboring homesteads. Until this second toilet is completed, the extra materials will be locked inside the NCP building and guarded by the NCP adult leaders.

We are grateful to Shari for completing this excellent project.

Tawa Fall Elementary School Bathroom Project - Senegal

Tawa Fall Elementary School Bathroom Project - SenegalLocation
Tawa Fall, Thies, Senegal

Community Description
Tawa Fall is located near Thies, the capital of Thies Region in Senegal.

Problem Addressed
The elementary school in the village has functioned with no bathroom since it was built. Students use the bushes around the school or they wait until they go home.

Project Description
This project is to build a three-stall latrine, two for students, and one for teachers, with running water for handwashing.

Tawa Fall Elementary School Bathroom Project - SenegalThe project is being implemented by the Tawa Fall Elementary School Bathroom Committee and will be directed by a skilled mason.

Water Charity funds will go toward materials, including cement, gravel, sand, and PVC piping.

The community has already begun digging the pit, and will provide unskilled labor.

There will be instruction on latrine usage. Monitoring by teachers will encourage habitual, effective handwashing after bathroom use.

Project Impact
80 students will benefit from the project

Tawa Fall Elementary School Bathroom Project - SenegalPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Karen Chaffraix

Comments
Water Charity is participating in this project in coordination with the Peace Corps Partnership Program. In providing the “last dollars needed” (sometimes a small amount and sometimes large), we give the push to start the projects immediately.

New skills will be gained by the participants in effective sanitation and handwashing. Participation from the community will lead to empowerment to undertake future projects, as well as improved health and sanitation.

Dollar Amount of Project
$117.72

Donations Collected to Date
$0.00

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

Dollar Amount Needed
$117.72

Bamkoto Latrine Project - Senegal

Bamkoto Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
Bamkoto, Kaffrine, Senegal

Community Description
Bamkoto is a small village in Kaffrine, comprised of 160 people living in 8 compounds.

Problem Addressed
There is only one latrine in the village. For most adults and children, the only place to urinate and defecate is in the surrounding fields. The lack of a proper waste disposal system is responsible for many cases of diarrhea and other sanitation-related illnesses in the area.

Project Description
This project is to build 8 latrines in Bamkoto.

Each household will be responsible for digging a 2 x 2 meter hole and making the necessary bricks. The hole will be reinforced with cement bricks. A pipe will connect the toilet with the pit, and a screened vertical pipe will provide ventilation while preventing the entry of mosquitos.

Bamkoto Latrine Project - SenegalThe materials will be purchased in Kaffrine and transported to Bamkoto on horse carts.

A skilled mason will manage the construction, with the help of 18 villagers.

After all the latrines have been completed, there will be a community training on how to prevent diarrhea, including the importance of washing hands with soap.

With the skills developed, villagers will have the capacity to keep the latrines in repair and build more in the future as the village grows.

Project Impact
150 people will benefit from the project.

Bamkoto Latrine Project - SenegalPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jessie Maier

Comments
With the completion of this project there will be a latrine in every compound, eliminating the open defecation that currently causes diseases such as diarrhea, dysentery, typhoid, and cholera.

Dollar Amount of Project
$438.46

Donations Collected to Date
$0.00

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

Dollar Amount Needed
$438.46

Conclusion of Kwemaramba Secondary School Water Project – Tanzania

Conclusion of Kwemaramba Secondary School Water Project – TanzaniaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Theodore Lin. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to renovate two rainwater catchment and storage systems at the school.

Theodore reports:

After 3 long rainy months, the repair of the rainwater catchment system and the building of the new gutters at Kwemaramba Secondary School have finally been completed.

We immediately went to work and the contractor we hired cleaned out the gutters and added extra support to each of the gutters to ensure there would be no leakage. Cleaning and repairing the gutters took approximately 1 week.

We then added a spigot to the tank to have easier access to the water. We decided to wait for the first rainfall to see if the tank had a leak that truly needed to be fixed. After the first heavy rainfall, the tank had about 2 ft. of water in it which was less than expected. We had discovered that there was a leak around where the spigot had been installed. The students were able to use a rope and bucket to fetch the remaining water while we planned to seal the tank.

We had to wait for the tank to be completely empty before we started to line the inside of the tank with waterproof cement. We were able to get over 1,000 liters of water before the tank was completely sealed. To completely use all the water took approximately 1 month because the work was being done during the rainy season so it continuously filled up.

We spent one day to seal the tank on a beautiful sunny day. Immediately after the tank was sealed, there was heavy rainfall and the sealant withstood the heavy pressure of the water. The tank is now over half full with approximately 10,000 liters of water and adding each rainfall.

Conclusion of Kwemaramba Secondary School Water Project – TanzaniaAdding the gutters to the already existing catchment system was delayed by one month because there was a lack of proper fascia boards necessary to nail the gutters to. We had also decided to switch from aluminum gutters to more expensive plastic gutters so that we could use the gutter system for a much longer period.

Once we got the fascia board we were able to complete the gutter system within 2 days. The next day there was very light rain but the rain water catchment system was so efficient it filled up the 1,000 liter catchment halfway. We had begun to use half of the water and the following day it rained heavily and the catchment was overflowing.

The students are now happy they don’t have to walk downhill every morning to fetch the unsafe river water. With over 10,000 liters of water, we have plenty of water to meet the needs of 400 students and staff at our school and villagers around.

We have started to sell the excess rain water to the teachers living nearby at a nominal price of $0.03 per 10 L bucket. The money will be used to ensure that the tank will be in good repair in the future. The school now has plenty of clean rain water the students and staff can drink. We have also used the money to purchase ceramic candle water filters to filter the rain water. The school no longer has to use firewood to boil water. In this area, deforestation is a huge problem and we are doing our part to reduce the amount of firewood we use at our school.

On behalf of Kwemaramba Secondary School, we wanted to thank first, Water Charity for supporting our project. Second, we wanted to thank all of the donors. Without their donations we would not have been able to complete this project. Our school will enjoy cleaner and safer drinking water for an indefinite amount of time.

We, in turn, extend our thanks to Theodore for completing this important project, and again express our gratitude to the donors for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Kwemaramba Secondary School Water Project – TanzaniaConclusion of Kwemaramba Secondary School Water Project – Tanzania
Conclusion of Kwemaramba Secondary School Water Project – TanzaniaConclusion of Kwemaramba Secondary School Water Project – Tanzania
Conclusion of Kwemaramba Secondary School Water Project – TanzaniaConclusion of Kwemaramba Secondary School Water Project – Tanzania
Conclusion of Kwemaramba Secondary School Water Project – TanzaniaConclusion of Kwemaramba Secondary School Water Project – Tanzania

Shown Above Are Our Latest Projects

To see our other projects, please use the Search Box above, or the Country, Status of Projects, and Funds Needed boxes to the right.

Donate

Water Charity is a 501(c)(3) public charity. If you like the work we are doing, we invite you to make a tax-exempt donation of any amount.

Visit Water Charity

Water CharityCheck out the other great water, sanitation, and public health projects that Water Charity is doing all over the world.

Project Status

Syndicate

Syndicate content

United We Serve

Peace CorpsThis summer the Peace Corps community has an opportunity to be part of an extraordinary effort to improve our communities through volunteer service. President Obama’s summer service initiative, United We Serve, is a call to all Americans to join a volunteer effort this summer and be part of building a new foundation for America, one community at a time. Please visit the United We Serve website to learn about how you can be a part.